Photos:Doctors Protest At FMC Owerri Over Unpaid Wages

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Doctors at Federal Medical Centre Owerri today protested over unpaid wages and said they will soon embark on indefinite strike. The doctors complained that the FMC management has formed a habit of not paying salaries and entitlements, and with so many deductions when they eventually pay.

Someone in the know said the residents haven’t been paid September 2013 salary. The house officers who worked for 3 months received payment for only two months with so many deductions. They say this is not fair considering the health hazards they are exposed to on a daily basis and the fact that they are always away from their families on call only to have their salaries cut in half. See more pics from the protest after the cut…

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Men Health Corner:Things That Can Deflate Your Erection Depression

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The brain is an often-overlooked erogenous zone. Sexual excitement starts in your head and works its way down. Depression can dampen your desire and can lead to erectile dysfunction. Ironically, many of the drugs used to treat depression can also suppress your sex drive and make it harder to get an erection, and they can cause a delay in your orgasm.
Alcohol

You might consider having a few drinks to get in the mood, but overindulging could make it harder for you to finish the act. Heavy alcohol use can interfere with erections, but the effects are usually temporary. The good news is that moderate drinking — one or two drinks a day — might have health benefits like reducing heart disease risks. And those risks are similar to erectile dysfunction risks.
Medications

The contents of your medicine cabinet could affect your performance in the bedroom. A long list of common drugs can cause ED, including certain blood pressure drugs, pain medications, and antidepressants. Street drugs like amphetamines, cocaine, and marijuana can cause sexual problems in men, too.

Stress

It’s not easy to get in the mood when you’re overwhelmed by responsibilities at work and home. Stress can take its toll on many different parts of your body, including your penis. Deal with stress by making lifestyle changes that promote well-being and relaxation, such as exercising regularly, getting enough sleep, and seeking professional help when appropriate.
Anger

Anger can make the blood rush to your face, but not to the one place you need it when you want to have sex. It’s not easy to feel romantic when you’re raging, whether your anger is directed at your partner or not. Unexpressed anger or improperly expressed anger can contribute to performance problems in the bedroom.

Anxiety

Worrying that you won’t be able to perform in bed can make it harder for you to do just that. Anxiety from other parts of your life can also spill over into the bedroom. All that worry can make you fear and avoid intimacy, which can spiral into a vicious cycle that puts a big strain on your sex life — and relationship.
Middle-Aged Spread

Carrying extra pounds can impact your sexual performance, and not just by lowering your self-esteem. Obese men have lower levels of the male hormone testosterone, which is important for sexual desire and producing an erection. Being overweight is also linked to high blood pressure and hardening of the arteries, which can reduce blood flow to the penis.
Self-Image

When you don’t like what you see in the mirror, it’s easy to assume your partner isn’t going to like the view, either. A negative self-image can make you worry not only about how you look, but also how well you’re going to perform in bed. That performance anxiety can make you too anxious to even attempt sex.
Low Libido

Low libido isn’t the same as erectile dysfunction, but a lot of the same factors that stifle an erection can also dampen your interest in sex. Low self-esteem, stress, anxiety, and certain medications can all reduce your sex drive. When all those worries are tied up with making love, your interest in sex can take a nosedive.
Your Health

Many different health conditions can affect the nerves, muscles, or blood flow that is needed to have an erection. Diabetes, high blood pressure, hardening of the arteries, spinal cord injuries, and multiple sclerosis can contribute to ED. Surgery to treat prostate or bladder problems can also affect the nerves and blood vessels that control an erection.

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How to Solve Erection Problems

It can be embarrassing to talk to your doctor about your sex life, but it’s the best way to get treated and get back to being intimate with your partner. Your doctor can pinpoint the source of the problem and may recommend lifestyle interventions like quitting smoking or losing weight. Other treatment options are ED drugs, hormone treatments, a suction device that helps create an erection, or counseling.

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Soft Drinks:Its Detrimental Effects To Human Health

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It has been experimentally proved that soft drinks are one of the prominent reasons for obesity. The weight gain is directly related to the amount of soft drink that a person takes in. With every single can, people unknowingly add many extra calories to their body weight.

* Another very common effect of soft drinks is diabetes. With every can of soft drink, people add large amount of sugar in their body. Long habitual intake of soft drinks can lead to ineffective insulin production from pancreases which consequently affect the sugar level in the body. This further leads to diabetes.

* It has been proved that frequent consumption of soft drink can lead to weakening of the bones and osteoporosis. Soft drinks impair the calcification of the growing bones in children.

* Studies also say that soft drinks increase the risk of tooth decay. The acidic content of soft drinks can dissolve the tooth enamel and make them weaker. It is recommended that people should avoid taking soft drinks between meals to prevent dental erosion and tooth decay.

* This fact may shock you, but is quite true. Researches have proved that constant and habitual intake of soft drink can lead to kidney stones formation. This happens because of the acidic and mineral radical balance. The body tries to buffer the acidity caused by the soft drinks with the calcium from the bones. This leads to calcium erosion, which ultimately gets settled in the kidney in the form of stones.

* Soft drink also leads to impaired digestive system. Soft drink contains phosphoric acid which competes with the hydrochloric acid present in stomach and affects its functioning. The ineffectiveness of stomach leads to undigested food which further causes indigestion and gassiness.

* Soft drinks cause dehydration in the body. Both the sugar and caffeine components of soft drinks are dehydrating agents. They both lead to excess urination, which makes you thirstier than before.

* Soft drinks have strong caffeine content. Caffeine causes irritability, restlessness, tension, high blood pressure, excessive urination and other side effects. It is also believed that soft drinks increase blood pressure. Some studies also claim that soft drink has harmful effects on liver.

* The sweetener used in soft drinks is Aspartame. It is 200 times sweeter than normal sugar and is far more harmful with many side effects.

Next time, when head towards the refrigerator or a store to satiate your thirst with a can of soft drink, make sure you remind yourself of all the side effects that gulping down the beverage will bring forth.

Don’t Forget to share

Information Nigeria

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Source:Information Nigeria

Kenyan Undergraduate Infects 324 Men with HIV/AIDS

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A Kenyan undergraduate has opened up on how she infected 324 men with HIV/AIDS and was still targeting 2000. She wrote her confession in her Facebook inbox, which she sent to a campus magazine, but warned them to hide her identity. I can only shout God have mercy after reading her confession.
Read her full message below:
”I see you people exposing scandals I also have a big one to tell just don’t expose my name” was her opening clause to Kenya Scandals. I’m 19 and a 2nd year here at Kabarak Uni, I joined this college a virgin though I have had boyfriends before, my parents are strict so having s*x was never on my mind. Sep 22nd 2013 is a day I will never forget, we went clubbing in town and got drunk with some senior students then went back hostels for party round 2, I remember less but I remember waking up nak*d to some guy called Javan with my P painful and knew he had s*x with me when drunk I only asked if he used a condom and he said yes, however when taking bath I noticed sperms down there, I wanted to commit suicide, I feared getting pregnant and HIV, took contras and hoped I was HIV free.

In November i tested HIV positive, I felt like cutting off my neck, I confronted that guy and he insisted he was clean that I got it from somewhere, I was so depressed and took alcohol to die, I even bought poison, the pain was just unbearable how was I gonna face the world, I let my parents down, I gave up on the world and just wanted to end my life”.
Something came up in my mind that I should revenge, I hated men and didn’t want to be near any, my future had been ruined, somehow someone had to pay, after private therapies and sessions I gained strength not even my parents, friends knew of my conditions even up to now, my life would then take a turn and depend on ARVs. I accepted my fate and promised to make all men I come across suffer, I know I am attractive and men both married n unmarried chase me left right and center, luckily my body has remained good and if anything my curves got better something you men like.
I buried the good girl in me and became the bad girl, my goal was to infect as many as possible so far since Dec up to now I have infected 324 men and I make sure to note down there list which I secretly keep when ill be on my death bed I will release it.
I know I have nothing left to do on earth but wait for my death but before I do, men will get it. My target is over 2k by the end of the year, pregnancy is out of question I am on contras so I just do raw which most men here love they don’t even question, my looks and body works greatly for me, I give it good. Of the 324 about 156 are students here at the college, the remaining are married men outside, lecturers, lawyers, some celebs and 3 politicians. Not a day passes without me having s*x, mostly 4 people per day”
She goes to conclude, “i know this story will get people talking but nothing will stop me from accomplishing my mission by continuing to sleep around, you never know but maybe you have slept with me or your husband, boyfriend, brother, father or any has slept with me and I never allow condom go have HIV test and for those who haven’t and here in Nakuru or outside, your day is coming, you men destroyed my life and I will make you and your people pay for it. I don’t have any regrets at all, I am gone for now, I have had one today and got two more men lined up to receive it.”
she daringly sums up her confession.

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Wonders:Second baby possibly ‘cured’ of HIV

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(CNN) – The first time, it happened almost by accident.

Just hours after delivery, a baby born with HIV in Mississippi was given high doses of three antiretroviral drugs. More than three years later, doctors say the little girl has no evidence of the life-threatening disease in her blood, despite being off medication for nearly two years.

Now doctors say another child born with the virus appears to be free of HIV after receiving similar treatment. The case report was presented at the annual Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections in Boston this week.

The girl was delivered at Miller Children’s Hospital in Long Beach, California, last summer to a mother with AIDS. Doctors gave the baby high doses of antiretroviral drugs — AZT, 3TC and Nevirapine — four hours after birth. Eleven days later, the virus was undetectable in her body and remained undetectable nine months later.

The California baby is still on antiretroviral treatment, so it’s too soon to tell if the child is actually in remission.

“Taking kids off antiretroviral therapy intentionally is not standard of care,” said Dr. Deborah Persaud, a virologist with Johns Hopkins Children’s Center who has been involved in both cases. “At this time, there is no plan to stop treatment.”

While doctors around the world are trying to duplicate the Mississippi case, more research needs to be done before new standards are implemented for treating babies born with HIV.

“This has to be done in a clinical trial setting, because really the only way we can prove that we’ve accomplished remission in these cases is by taking them off treatment, and that’s not without risks,” Persaud said during her presentation at the conference.

A clinical trial designed to test the effectiveness of this early treatment technique on infants born with HIV is set to begin in the next couple of months, she said.

The results could be a game changer in the fight against AIDS.

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Fight Against Poliomyelitis(Polio) Today,Get The African Child Immunised

This morning, some polio health workers visited our vicinity to immunise babies and children of five years old and below. I had to snap them while they were immunising a day old baby(as shown in the pic below). They told me that the federal government of Nigeria in collaboration with the ministry of health had made it compulsory for all children to be immunised and it is a free health service that will last for four days: Saturday to tuesday in all parts of the federation.20140301-131014.jpg

Poliomyelitis

Fact sheet N°114
April 2013

Key facts

Polio (poliomyelitis) mainly affects children under five years of age.
One in 200 infections leads to irreversible paralysis. Among those paralysed, 5% to 10% die when their breathing muscles become immobilized.
Polio cases have decreased by over 99% since 1988, from an
estimated 350 000 cases then, to 223 reported cases in 2012. The reduction is the result of the global effort to eradicate the disease.
In 2013, only three countries (Afghanistan, Nigeria and Pakistan) remain polio-endemic, down from more than 125 in 1988.
As long as a single child remains infected, children in all countries are at risk of contracting polio. Failure to eradicate polio from these last remaining strongholds could result in as many as 200 000 new cases every year, within 10 years, all over the world.
In most countries, the global effort has expanded capacities to tackle other infectious diseases by building effective surveillance and immunization systems.
Polio and its symptoms

Polio is a highly infectious disease caused by a virus. It invades the nervous system, and can cause total paralysis in a matter of hours. The virus enters the body through the mouth and multiplies in the intestine. Initial symptoms are fever, fatigue, headache, vomiting, stiffness in the neck and pain in the limbs. One in 200 infections leads to irreversible paralysis (usually in the legs). Among those paralysed, 5% to 10% die when their breathing muscles become immobilized.

People most at risk

Polio mainly affects children under five years of age.

Prevention

There is no cure for polio, it can only be prevented. Polio vaccine, given multiple times, can protect a child for life.

Global caseload

Polio cases have decreased by over 99% since 1988, from an estimated 350 000 cases in more than 125 endemic countries then, to 223 reported cases in 2012. In 2013, only parts of three countries in the world remain endemic for the disease–the smallest geographic area in history–and case numbers of wild poliovirus type 3 are down to lowest-ever levels.

The Global Polio Eradication Initiative

Launch
In 1988, the forty-first World Health Assembly adopted a resolution for the worldwide eradication of polio. It marked the launch of the Global Polio Eradication Initiative (GPEI), spearheaded by national governments, WHO, Rotary International, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), UNICEF, and supported by key partners including the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. This followed the certification of the eradication of smallpox in 1980, progress during the 1980s towards elimination of the poliovirus in the Americas, and Rotary International’s commitment to raise funds to protect all children from the disease.

Progress
Overall, since the GPEI was launched, the number of cases has fallen by over 99%. In 2013, only three countries in the world remain polio-endemic: Nigeria, Pakistan and Afghanistan.

In 1994, the WHO Region of the Americas was certified polio-free, followed by the WHO Western Pacific Region in 2000 and the WHO European Region in June 2002. Of the three types of wild poliovirus (type 1, type 2 and type 3), type 2 wild poliovirus transmission has been successfully stopped (since 1999).

More than 10 million people are today walking, who would otherwise have been paralysed. An estimated more than 1.5 million childhood deaths have been prevented, through the systematic administration of Vitamin A during polio immunization activities.

Opportunity and risks: an emergency approach
The strategies for polio eradication work when they are fully implemented. This is clearly demonstrated by India’s success in stopping polio in January 2011, in arguably the most technically-challenging place. However, failure to implement strategic approaches leads to ongoing transmission of the virus. Endemic transmission is continuing in Nigeria, Pakistan and Afghanistan. Failure to stop polio in these last remaining areas could result in as many as 200 000 new cases every year, within 10 years, all over the world.

Recognizing both the epidemiological opportunity and the significant risks of potential failure, the World Health Assembly in May 2012 adopted a resolution declaring the completion of polio eradication a programmatic emergency for global public health and called for the development of a comprehensive polio eradication and endgame strategy through 2018 to secure a lasting polio-free world.

Subsequently, the three remaining endemic countries launched national polio emergency action plans, overseen in each case by the respective head of state, and the partner agencies of the GPEI also moved their operations to an emergency footing, working under the auspices of the Global Emergency Action Plan 2012-2013. By the start of 2013, the impact of the emergency approaches is being seen, with the lowest number of reported cases in fewer districts of fewer countries than at any previous time.

Since then, the new Polio Eradication and Endgame Strategic Plan 2013-2018 has been developed, in consultation with polio-affected countries, stakeholders, donors, partners and national and international advisory bodies. The new Plan was presented at a Global Vaccine Summit in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates, at the end of April 2013. It is the first plan to eradicate all types of polio disease simultaneously – both due to wild poliovirus and due to vaccine-derived polioviruses.

Global leaders and individual philanthropists signaled their confidence in the Plan by pledging three-quarters of the Plan’s projected US$5.5 billion cost over the six years. They also called upon additional donors to commit upfront the additional US$1.5 billion needed to secure a lasting polio-free world.

Future benefits of polio eradication
Once polio is eradicated, the world can celebrate the delivery of a major global public good that will benefit all people equally, no matter where they live. Economic modelling has found that the eradication of polio would save at least US$ 40–50 billion over the next 20 years, mostly in low-income countries. Most importantly, success will mean that no child will ever again suffer the terrible effects of lifelong polio-paralysis.

WHO

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Make sure that your child/children are immuned today against this killer disease, spread the word and tell others!

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